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Parental Alienation Archives

Long-term effects of parental alienation on the child

As regular readers of our Ann Arbor legal blog know, parental alienation is sometimes a part of high-conflict child custody disputes. A recent Psych Central column by Sharie Stines, Psy.D on the painful phenomenon looked at the long-term effects on the child who has been alienated.

Parental alienation: diving into a decision

When their parents divorced, the three daughters, ages 7, 13 and 15, spent two days a week with one and the remaining five days with the other. The following week, the time allotments for the parents were switched. The parents had joint legal custody, according to the divorce agreement, with the father, a professor, tabbed as the primary custodial parent.

Denial of Parenting Time During Holidays?

A common strategy employed by the alienating parent is to limit contact between the target parent and the child. Holidays - Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, Birthdays - are special times. They not only rekindle past memories of times enjoyed by the parent and the child but offer opportunities to create new memories. Alienators violate parenting plans. They take advantage of ambiguities in court orders to deny the target parent time with the child. The child acclimates to the new "status quo" and before long, the alienator insists that the target parent's time be reduced to what's now "status quo."

Parental Alienation: What Can (and Should) the Courts Do?

Parental alienation can have devastating consequences. More and more courts around the country and internationally are condemning alienating behaviors and taking action to remedy the matters. In part 2 of my 2-part article on parental alienation, I discuss what can (and should) the courts do to intervene in a situation involving parental alienation. 

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